African servals, exotic cats as pets

Serval/Exotic Cat Care
Vitamins and Nuritional Supplements
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The most often used supplements are Oasis, Wildtrax, and Mazuri

Servals are long-legged, comparatively delicate, fast-growing cats, and getting enough calcium is critical to their development.

Primal-Cal is a calcium-only supplement designed to be fed in addition to a low-calcium supplement such as Wild Trax or Oasis Felidae.

As a disclaimer, I would like to make it clear that I am not a veterinarian or an animal nutrition expert. This site is written by a layperson and is not intended to diagnose or provide veterinary advice. Always consult your veterinarian before making a final decision on any health or nutrition matters.

The most often used supplements are Oasis, Wildtrax, and Mazuri. Some people also suggest Centrum, a human vitamin supplement. There are two primary concerns in providing vitamin supplements for your wild feline if you are feeding a raw meat diet. The first is to provide proper levels of any vitamins that may be missing from the diet you are feeding. The second is to ensure that your serval is getting the proper amount of calcium and to ensure that he is getting correct ratios of calcium and phosphorous.

Servals are long-legged, comparatively delicate, fast-growing cats, and getting enough calcium is critical to their development. Keep in mind that the serval’s natural prey consists of small animals, normally consumed bones and all. So if your serval is not eating a fair amount of bone in his diet, chances are he will need an additional calcium supplement. Before deciding what to give, I would discuss your proposed diet with your vet (if he or she is knowledgeable about exotics), the vitamin company, and your cat’s breeder. The calcium and phosphorous requirements can vary considerably depending on what you plan to feed. A diet consisting primarily of chicken necks would require much different supplementation from an all-beef diet or a mixed diet.

Wild Trax and Oasis vitamin are similar but not identical in nutritional content, and they are made in different bases, so your individual cat may prefer one to the other.

Oasis/Apperon

Apperon makes a number of high-quality, reasonably priced wild feline supplements developed specifically to supplement raw meat diets. Oasis Felidae contains 1.5-2.5 % calcium. Oasis Felidae T is the same, but with added Taurine. These vitamins have a Malto-dextrin base and stick to meat easily. Oasis Felidae CA has higher levels of calcium (30-34%) and no malto-dextrin base. These supplements also contain probiotics such as acidophilus.

Primal-Cal is a calcium-only supplement designed to be fed in addition to a low-calcium supplement such as Wild Trax or Oasis Felidae.

Wild Trax

The Wild Trax vitamin is another high-quality supplement intended for use with a meat and bone diet. If bone is lacking in the diet then an additional calcium supplement should be added. The calcium content is listed as 3-5%.

Wild Trax is made in a base of brewer's yeast, which contains amino acids that help the body repair tissue and fight disease. Many cats find brewer’s yeast very palatable, and it sticks well to meat. Wildtrax is similar in taste and texture to a vitamin called Chaparral, which was used very successfully for exotic felines until the company went out of business. Wild Trax is very reasonably priced, and profit from sales of the product benefit Wild Trax Feline Center.

Mazuri

Mazuri makes two carnivore supplements, one for whole prey diets and one for slab meat diets. The whole prey supplement contains no calcium, while the slab meat supplement contains 19.2% calcium. They are very expensive, and rather unimpressively marketed “for all carnivorous species.” Does this mean a ferret has the same nutritional needs as a tiger?



 

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© Jessi Clark-White, 2004
Vitamins and Nutritional Supplements for Servals, Caracals, and other Small Exotic Cats